Paul van den Broek, PhD

 

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Paul foto 08-2012Paul van den Broek is Professor of Education Sciences at Leiden University and professor in cognitive sciences at the University of Minnesota, USA. He received his PhD in 1985 from the University of Chicago, and has been on the faculty at the University of Minnesota since 1987 and in Leiden since 2008. In his research, Paul and his collaborators examine the cognitive and neurological structures and processes involved in learning and reading, from early childhood to adulthood. The goals of the research program are to identify such structures and processes and their development –both when they succeed and when they fail-, and to derive implications for effective diagnostic and intervention tools.
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Linda van Leijenhorst, PhD

 

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Linda van Leijenhorst is Assistant Professor at the Department of Education and Child Studies. She received her Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology from Leiden University in 2010 and spent 18 months as a postdoctoral fellow at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) before moving back to Leiden in 2011. Linda's research is centered around the question how the ability to control our thoughts and behavior changes with development, and how this development relates to changes in brain function and structure. She examines these questions in children, adolescents and young adults using behavioral as well as functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) methods. Her current research aims to elucidate the development of reading comprehension in relation to brain development.
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Dietsje Jolles, PhD

 

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Dietsje Jolles is an Assistant Professor at the Department of Education and Child Studies. After receiving her Ph.D. from Leiden University in 2011, she has spent 2,5 years as a post-doctoral fellow at Stanford University. In her research Dietsje takes a developmental cognitive neuroscience approach to better understand learning and skill acquisition in children. Her doctoral research focused on the development and acquisition of foundational cognitive abilities like working memory, in relation to changes in the underlying brain mechanisms. During her postdoctoral fellowship, she has extended this line of work into the domain of educational neuroscience, investigating the cognitive and neural mechanisms that contribute to math learning in childhood. Dietsje's future work will focus on individual differences and neurocognitive development in relation to the acquisition of math and reading comprehension skills in children.
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Arnout Koornneef, PhD

 

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Arnout Koornneef is Assistant Professor at the Department of Education and Child Studies. He received his Ph.D. from Utrecht University in 2008. Afterwards he spent 4 years as a teacher (and post-doctoral fellow) in the Linguistics Department of the same university and in 2012 he was a visiting professor at the University of Florida. Arnout's research focuses on the question how the human language comprehension system knows what is important in a text, and can anticipate what is going to be important later on. In his current VENI-project he addresses this issue from a life-span perspective. More specifically, using eye-tracking methodologies he examines how younger and older adult readers use linguistic cues such as pronouns (e.g. 'he', 'she') and connectives (e.g. 'because', 'so') to construct a coherent mental representation of a text. 
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Marian Hickendorff, PhD

 

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This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.Marian Hickendorff is assistant professor at the department of Education and Child Studies. She received her PhD at Leiden University in 2011. Marian focuses on research on children’s mathematical cognition. In particular she is interested in how 10-12 year-olds solve multidigit arithmetic problems, such as 843-299 or 756:12, not only focusing on performance but also on the solution strategy used. A central question is what child and problem factors influence children’s strategy competence. A recurring theme is to what extent children can be classified in distinct profiles or patterns of strategy use. To identify such qualitative or categorical individual differences Marian uses advanced psychometric models.
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Maartje Raijmakers, PhD

 

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Maartje Raijmakers studied philosophy, with the specialization of Philosophical Logic & Artificial Intelligence at the University of Amsterdam. Her PhD was in Cognitive Development at the University of Amsterdam (promotor P. Molenaar). At this department she had several postdoc-positions and since 2008 she has been associative professor (from August 2015 to July 2016, 1 day a week). In 2011 she became endowed professor at the UvA and NCWT/science center NEMO: Cognitive Development, in particular science learning in non-formal contexts. Starting August 2015 she is ass. professor at the department of Educational Sciences of the institute of Pedagogics, Faculty of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Leiden University.
Research by Maartje Raijmakers concerns development of learning with applications in science education. The existence of different learning processes (e.g., rational and associative learning) implies individual differences between and within individuals. With mathematical models we study heterogeneity and important related factors such as curiosity and executive functions, in a developmental context.
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Collaborator

Nadira Saab, PhD

Nadira Saab received her Ph.D. in Developmental and Educational Psychology from the University of Amsterdam in 2005. Nadira's research focuses on the impact of powerful and innovative learning methods on learning processes, such as collaborative learning, computer assisted learning and assessment and motivation. She studies these questions in children, adolescents and young adults using behavioral methods.

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