Katinka Beker, PhDKatinka

Katinka Beker has received her master’s degree in Educational and Developmental Psychology in 2010 at the Erasmus University in Rotterdam. Ever since her work as a research assistant she has been interested in the way education influences children's  learning. After her graduation she has worked as a tutor at the Erasmus University at the Department of Psychology. In september 2011 she started working as a PhD student in the Brain and Education Lab at Leiden University under supervision of Prof. Paul van den Broek and Dr. Linda van Leijenhorst. In march 2017 she sucessfully defended her PhD-thesis. She is interested in the cognitive and neurological mechanisms of reading comprehension in children and adolescents. Her project aims to examine ways in which this knowledge can be used in educational settings.

Anne Helder, PhD

Anne2Anne Helder received her MSc. degree in clinical neuropsychology at the Vrije Universiteit in Amsterdam. In November 2010 she started as a PhD student in the Brain and Education Lab at Leiden University, supervised by Prof. dr. Paul van den Broek and Dr. Linda van Leijenhorst. In november 2016 she sucessfully defended her PhD-thesis. Anne's research regards cognitive and neurological processes involved in the development of reading comprehension. 

CV

Lesya Ganushchak, PhD
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Lesya Ganushchak is a Postdoctoral researcher at the Department of Education and Child Studies. She received her Ph.D. in Psychology from Leiden University in 2008 and spent 24 months as a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Birmingham, UK. Afterwards, she spent 24 months as a postdoctoral fellow at the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics in Nijmegen, before moving back to Leiden in 2012. Lesya's research is centred around the question which cognitive processes (e.g., working memory) determine behaviour during talking and spoken/written comprehension. She examines these questions using behavioural, electroencephalogram recordings (EEG), and eye-tracking methods. Lesya is currently involved in the MUSE project and her current research aims are to examine the potential of using interactive storytelling in a 3D game environment to promote individual's reading comprehension skills.

Katinka Beker has received her master’s degree in Educational and Developmental Psychology in 2010 at the Erasmus University in Rotterdam. Ever since her work as a research assistant she has been interested in the way education influences children's  learning. After her graduation she has worked as a tutor at the Erasmus University at the Department of Psychology. In september 2011 she started working as a PhD student in the Brain and Education Lab at Leiden University under supervision of Prof. Paul van den Broek and Dr. Linda van Leijenhorst. She is interested in the cognitive and neurological mechanisms of reading comprehension in children and adolescents. Her project aims to examine ways in which this knowledge can be used in educational settings.